Archive for September, 2012

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Sep 24

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FerrumForge pumped out another cool SM-100 folding knife.

Elliot's SM-100 folder knife

Elliot's SM-100 folder knife

Elliot's SM-100 folder knife

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Sep 17

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I had to post this picture of Summit’s youngest out on a fishing trip with his first Strider.  My guys always want to look at my knives and I always have one on me, so when the fish weren’t biting this day I decided it might be a good time to begin to teach some basic knife safety with my SM-100 Strider to my 3-year old.  Turns out that he just wanted to see it ‘cut stuff’, which was cool too!

First SM-100 Strider Folder

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Sep 12

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Jeremy Robertson over at Calavera Cutlery made a few SM-100 versions of his El Patron folder.  Love the simple, clean lines on his knives.

SM-100 El Patron

SM-100 El Patron

SM-100 El Patron from Calavera - Jeremy Robertson.

SM-100 El Patron from Calavera - Jeremy Robertson.

 

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Sep 04

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We’ve gotten a few questions recently regarding the unique microstructure people are seeing in our SM-100 material so we thought it might be nice to show a picture comparing a cast and a powder metallurgy (Hot Isostatically Pressed) microstructure.

As you can see in the as-cast micro – grain sizes are on the order of 50-microns, while the as-HIP sample is more like 10-microns.

So what does this (practically) mean?

Well, it depends on what your application is.  Entire books are written on just this subject, but in general, and in a nut shell, a finer microstructure improves mechanical properties.  All those grain boundaries help arrest any cracks that might be trying to propagate their way through your part.  Whereas in a large grain structure the cracks run freely along the grain boundary superhighway that make up the microstructure and failures are more likely to occur.

For the aerospace guys, it also means that non-destructive testing is also much easier – in fact you’ll find that most x-ray and NDT samples are HIP specimens.

 

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